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Conference Speakers, Panelists and MC

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Keynote Speakers 

Karl Wilding

Director Public Policy, National Council of Voluntary Organisations UK

Karl leads NCVO's policy, research and campaigning work in the UK and internationally, with lead responsibility for shaping the external environment for the voluntary sector.

Karl’s professional interests include voluntary sector funding and finance, the relative roles of the state and voluntary organisations, and the impact of new technologies (such as open data) on voluntary action and blogs about the big issues facing voluntary organisations at www.ncvo-vol.org.uk/karlwilding

Karl is an Honorary Visiting Fellow at Cass Business School’s Centre for Charity Effectiveness, where he also contributes to the ESRC Centre for Giving and Philanthropy, and a trustee of Charity Bank, Beat Bullying, Creating the Future and the St Albans Centre for Voluntary Service. Previously Karl was Vice Chair of The Charities Evaluation Services and on the Board of the Association of Research in the Voluntary and Community Sector.

Mick Gooda

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner Australian Human Rights Commission

Photo of Mick Gooda

Mick Gooda is a descendant of the Gangulu people of central Queensland and is the current Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner. His term in this position commenced in February 2010.

Mick has a long experience in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander affairs, having worked remote, rural and urban environments throughout Australia for over 30 years. He has a strong record of achievement in implementing program and organisational reform and delivering strategic and sustainable results across the country.

As Commissioner, Mick builds on this experience to advocate the human rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in Australia and then promote respect and understanding of these rights among the broader Australian community.

Dr Rachel Perkins OBE

Dr Perkins is one of the world’s most prolific and influential voices in mental health Recovery. Her combined professional and lived experience has been instrumental in driving significant change in the UK.

She has worked in UK NHS Mental Health Services for 30 years.  Initially a Clinical Psychologist, she then became a Clinical Director (initially of Rehabilitation Services, then all Adult Services in South West London) and finally Director of Quality Assurance and User Experience at South West London and St. George’s Mental Health NHS Trust. 

Currently Dr Perkins is:

  • A senior consultant with the UK national ‘Implementing Recovery through Organisational Change’ programme (a programme to help organizations to develop more recovery-focused practice delivered by a partnership between the NHS Confederation and Centre for Mental Health). 
  • Chair of the English Department of Health Working Group on Equalities in Mental Health. 
  • A member of the English Mental Health Strategy Ministerial Advisory Group.
  • Co-editor of the journal Mental Health and Social Inclusion.
She lives and works with a long term mental health condition, is a member of National Mind External Relations Committee and provides consultancy and training nationally and internationally (most recently in Australia, New Zealand, Norway, Denmark and the Republic of Ireland). The focus of much of this work is assisting organisations, and the staff within them, to work in partnership with people using services to create services that better promote the recovery of those whom they serve. In 2010 she was voted Mind Champion of the Year and awarded an OBE for services to mental health

Master of Ceremonies 

Narelda Jacobs

Neralda jacobs

Narelda Jacobs is an Aboriginal/Irish woman born in Perth, Western Australia. Her father is from the Mooro tribe of the Perth wheatbelt, her mother spent her early childhood in Belfast, before her family immigrated to Australia.

Narelda commenced her work-life in 1993 at the National Native Title Tribunal. She started at the front desk then worked her way into the Media Unit, where she started realising her childhood dream of a career in the media. 

 In 2000 Narelda joined Network Ten in Perth as a news reporter and in 2007 she was appointed presenter of Ten News at Five, becoming the first indigenous female news anchor for a commercial network.

Away from the television cameras, Narelda is an ambassador for Breast Cancer Care WA, the David Wirrpanda Foundation and the Disability Services Commission "Count me in" program.

She is also a patron of the Motor Neurone Disease Association WA, as well as patron of a specialised program for indigenous students at Balga Senior High School. She's a mentor through the Smith Family and regularly visits girls in juvenile detention as a role model.

Narelda understands the importance of providing young children with role models, and so she often volunteers her time to visit schools in the surrounding areas. She talks to children about the importance of self-respect and the importance of building a future. She focuses on the importance of taking responsibility for your own actions, to stop blaming others and to start healing.

She relishes her role as a mentor for young Noongar people.

Panelists

Anne Holland - CEO, Benevolent Society
Elena Douglas - Convener, Centre for Social Impact
Francis Lynch - CEO, Ruah/ President, ACOSS
Fred Chaney - 2014 Senior Australian of the Year
Lockie Cooke - CEO and Founder, Indigenous Communities Education and Awareness Foundation (ICEA)


Paul Bide - Chairperson, School of Social Entrepreneurs
Rhonda Adamson - CEO, The Spiers Centre
Robyn Kruk AM - Chairperson, WA Partnership Forum
Robyn Massey - Executive Director, My Way Project, Disability Services Commission
Steve Joske CSC - CEO, Australian Red Cross WA
Sue Ash - CEO, UnitingCare West

 


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