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Essential Services Resources

This page is designed to assist community service providers, and advocates, with utility issues. By providing helpful tips, current information, access to services, and publication guides, WACOSS hopes this will assist front line workers, and our member organisations. 

 

Concessions, financial assistance & advice and resolving disputes

Concessions, financial support and subsidy schemes for households having trouble paying their bills

Complaints and resolving disputes

Telephone services - Options if your clients are experiencing financial hardship

Service standard payments – when your clients might be eligible for compensation from their electricity or gas provider

Free independent financial information from a Financial Counsellor

Emergency (financial) relief and other assistance 

Reducing the household’s energy, water and telecommunications (mobile, landline and internet) costs

Free energy efficiency home visits – Home Energy Saver Scheme (HESS)

Financial assistance for energy saving retrofits or appliances through the WA No Interest Loan Scheme (WA NILS)   

Renting and energy efficiency

How to easily work out the running costs of a new appliance

What to do if your clients receive a higher than normal water bill? - Identifying and repairing water leaks, and claiming the Water Corporations leak allowance

How to help your client reduce their telecommunications (mobile, landline and internet) costs 

Energy Safety

Faulty or unsafe wiring - General

Faulty or unsafe wiring - Unenclosed joints in insulated cables

No (or only one) RCD fitted

How to tell if an RCD is fitted

No Smoke alarm

Other resources and campaigns

Helpful Resources and Websites for consumer advocates

Telephone services - All Australian’s regardless of location are entitled to a working landline, plus other universal service obligations

Stop door to door sales targeting your clients; join the ‘Do not knock’ campaign

Stop telemarketers targeting your clients; add them to the ‘Do Not Call Register’

Consumer protections under Australian Consumer Law – information on returning items without warranties and misleading consumers  

Resources for CALD communities 

Contact Information

WACOSS

Concessions and resolving disputes

 

Concessions, financial support and subsidy schemes for households having trouble paying their bills

There are a range of concessions that your clients might be eligible for. First thing to do is if there is anybody residing at a house that is eligible for a concession and their name is not on the bill, is to get their name on the bill. If you are not a concession card holder you can still be eligible for emergency relief and hardship assistance payments (see more info on the Hardship Utilities Grant scheme below). In addition the water, gas and electricity retailers must provide alternative payment arrangements for households in financial hardship.
Some of the concessions for electricity, water and gas include:

  • Cost of Living Assistance payment
  • Dependent Child Rebate
  • Air-conditioning rebates for people residing permanently in caravan parks and certain towns up north
  • Thermoregulatory Dysfunction Energy Subsidy
  • Life Support Equipment Energy Subsidy
  • Rebates on water charges (for pensioners and seniors card holders)
  • In addition there are emergency relief and hardship grants available. The Hardship Utility Grant scheme (HUGS) can provide support to households in financial hardship.  

All of the Western Australian’s government concessions can be found at the Concessions WA website.

A summary of WA Government concessions and rebates for electricity customers is on the Economic Regulatory website

For more information on subsidies, rebates and other assistance please visit:

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    Complaints and resolving disputes

    First of all call the utility directly to try and resolve the dispute (write down the details of the call - when you called time/date, who you spoke to and a general description of what was discussed). The Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN) provides this tip sheet on making complaints about landline, mobile or internet services. If you are not able to resolve the dispute then you might want to take the matter to the Energy Ombudsman, or for a telecommunications dispute contact the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman.  At present disputes about water services or water billing which cannot be resolved with the water service provider (eg the Water Corporation) should be directed to the Department of Water (this is expected to change July 1st 2013 with the introduction of a Water ombudsman scheme). 

    Visit there websites   

    If you complaint is not covered by these ombudsman then you might be able to take the complaint to a different dispute resolution body, to view a list of other dispute resolution bodies visit this website.  
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      Telephone services - Options if your clients are experiencing financial hardship

      ACCAN, the telecommunications consumer advocate provides a tip sheet for clients who can’t afford to pay a bill. While the Australian Communications and Media Authority provides a webpage on the various options your client may want to undertake if they are experiencing financial hardship. There are also credit management practices that the industry needs to comply with like notifying their customers when they are about to exceed their usage limit Click here to download an industry produced factsheet or download the industries Consumer Protection Code. If you believe that your clients provider is in breach of the code or have any issues with their phone provider you (or they) might want to contact the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman. They may also want to see 'How to help your client reduce their telecommunications costs' section.

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        Service standard payments – when your clients might be eligible for compensation from their electricity or gas provider

        Your clients may be eligible for financial compensation if they have

        • been wrongfully disconnected,
        • not been re-connected within the prescribed timeframes,
        • not been informed of planned interruptions (your electricity or gas is switched off for planned maintenance)
        • repeat interruptions (gas keeps getting turned off for unplanned work)
        • failure by the utility to respond to a gas leak within 3 hours of being informed
        • failure by the utility to acknowledge a written query or complaint.

        The Economic Regulation Authority’s website has more information on service standard payments for electricity and gas. If your clients believe that they are entitled to a service standard payment and have not received then you (or them) should contact the Energy Ombudsman.

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          Free independent financial information from a Financial Counsellor

          Depending on your clients' circumstances, they may want to obtain free independent financial information from a member of the Financial Counsellors' Association of Western Australia, their website has a directory of financial counsellors across WA. Alternatively your client can call 1800 007 007 if visiting a financial counsellor is difficult (eg, due to location or disability, etc).

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            Emergency (financial) relief and other assistance

            There are also a range of other service providers, including emergency relief providers that may offer assistance, you can use WACOSS’s service directory to help locate your nearest community service provider. 

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              Reducing the household’s energy and water costs


              Free energy efficiency home visits - Home Energy Saver Scheme (HESS)

               

              Anglicare WA, Red Cross (Darwin College) and the Geraldton Resource Centre are now delivering the Federal government’s Home Energy Saver Scheme (HESS) across Western Australia. The HESS program provides free, relaxed and friendly home visits by professional and experienced home energy assessors.  If your clients are wondering why their energy bills are so high, and/or are looking for advice on how to reduce their bills — then a HESS home visit may be for them!  The HESS program is linked to the WA NILS scheme.


              During the visit to your home, the HESS service provider will:
              • Look at your electricity, gas and water bills with you, and help you understand how to read your bills/monitor your energy usage.
              • Provide you with a personalized list of actions recommended to reduce your energy usage and save you money.
              • Be able to let you know about other places you can go for assistance, ie. provide referrals to financial counsellors, the WA NILS program and ER providers.
              In order to get the most out of the home visit, you are encouraged to:
              • Have your electricity, gas and water bills handy (for as far back as possible).
              • Have all the members of your household there.
              • Allow 1-1.5 hours for the visit.
              • If you can't keep your appointment, let the service provider know as soon as possible.

              To arrange a home visit, please contact:

              Anglicare WA (metro) — For North Metro households call Sean on (08) 9301 8560 or for South Metro call  (08) 9528 0730. Alternatively, email hess@anglicarewa.org.au.

              Anglicare WA (south west) — Are currently also providing home visits between  Yanchep and Albany, (08) 9528 0729. Email hess@anglicarewa.org.au for more information.

              Red Cross (Darwin College) — Covers areas in the Pilbara and Kimberly including the towns of Broome, Port Hedland, Karratha and Kununurra. To book a Community Education session or a home visit/audit ring (08) 8924 3972 or email hess@redcross.org.au.

              Geraldton Resource Centre — Phone (08) 9938 0600 or email Leeanne Robertson: leeanner@grc.asn.au or Karen Lewis karen@grc.asn.au

               

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              Financial assistance for energy saving retrofits or appliances through the WA No Interest Loan Scheme (WA NILS)

               

              The WA No Interest Loans Network Inc. provides families and individuals on low incomes across Western Australia the opportunity to apply for a loan to purchase essential products and services, without the burden of interest charges or fees.

               

              WA NILS provides loans between $200 and $1,500 for the purchase of essential products and services. It has Network Members right throughout Western Australia. Network Members include some community organisations and welfare groups.

              For more information, view their website or call them on 1300 365 301 (landlines) or (08) 9354 7611 (Mob). In addition your clients may be interested to see the list of items that they may want a loan for here (once there click on the Energy Efficiency button, loans for other Energy Efficiency (or general) items that are not on the list can be discussed with a loans officer). The WA NILS scheme is linked to the Home Energy Saver Scheme.

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                Renting and energy efficiency

                 

                The ATA Renters Guide to Sustainability provides useful information on ways renters can reduce their energy use around the home. Or for a simple a simple double sided brochure download our Energy Efficiency handout. Another useful resource is the Federal government’s Low or no cost energy efficiency improvements for renters brochure (please note this is quite old so the savings are based on electricity costing 12cents/unit, in WA we pay roughly 24cents/units, also needs to be printed on A5 paper, double sided). If your client is looking for a new place then the Searching for an energy efficient rental property brochure (needs to be printed on A5 paper, double sided) is a must. Knowing what to look for in a home could save your clients hundreds of dollars each year.

                 

                Some good on-line resources can be found on the Federal government’s Living Greener website and for renters Living Greener's guide for renters. If a household would like to purchase a new appliance or undertake a retrofit (if renting with the landlords consent) then they might be interested in applying for a WA No Interest Loan from a WA NILS provider. They provide no interest loans to concession card holders. Please visit the WA No Interest Loan Network website for more details.
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                  How to easily work out the running costs of a new appliance

                   

                  While electricity costs around 25cents per unit, a good way to work out the estimated running costs (based on assumptions on the label) is to divide the kWh per year by 4.

                  Energy Consumption (number in the red rectangle) Divide by 4 (which represents the 25cents) = estimated yearly cost. 

                   

                  Energy Rating example: 

                  (380 divided by 4 = $95)


                  Teaching your client this simple method can help them quickly determine which appliance cost less to run, and is therefore more energy efficient. With this information they will be able to compare the rough running costs of appliances and make the best decision. If an energy efficient appliance is slightly more expensive but with the lower energy use will save them a lot of money over the life of the appliance they might want to consider applying for a WA No Interest Loan

                  If your clients have access to the internet they can use the Living Greener appliance comparison tool. This tool allows them to look up different appliances to see and compare their running costs (and their potential savings). It can help your clients research which models they might want to buy and how much they will save over a products lifetime.     

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                    What to do if your clients receive a higher than normal water bill? - Identifying and repairing water leaks, and claiming the Water Corporations leak allowance

                     

                    If a client’s water bill is higher than expected there could be a water leak somewhere on their property. If they have an electric storage hot water tank then it is most likely that their power bills would have also gone up. If they are having trouble paying their electricity bill then they should contact their electricity provider (refer to Concessions, financial support and subsidy schemes for households having trouble paying their bills section).  If they have access to the water meter and they can ensure that no one else will use any water for an hour or two then they can check the leak by simply writing down the number inside the meter and then coming back and seeing if it has changed over the course of at least an hour (the longer the better). If there is a difference and no one has used any water than there is a good chance that they have a leak. If they don’t have access to the water meter but believe that there is a leak due to a high water bill, greener grass in one spot or water stains appearing on plaster or carpet or they have identified that there is a leak by the water meter test then they should inform the landlord if they are renting. If your client owns the property they should considering getting a specialised leak detection service or a plumber to look for and repair the leak.

                     

                    If your client is renting than they are required to notify the landlord (or real estate agent) if they have noticed a leak or believe that there is a leak. The real estate agent or landlord should arrange to have the leak investigated and fixed. If they indicate that your client is responsible for paying for maintenance and therefore should pay to have the leak repaired then your client (or you on their behalf if you have their consent) should contact the Department of Commerce (Consumer Protection division) by calling 1300 30 40 54 (National Relay Service: 13 36 77 for the hearing impaired) for advice, as in most circumstances it is the landlord who is responsible for the costs of repairs.

                     

                    The Water Corporation may be able to assist your client with paying for some this water with their leak allowance. The plumber should know about this and fill in this claim form when he or she comes to fix the leak. For more information about leak detection, repairing leaks and applying for the leak allow visit the Water Corporation’s Detecting and repairing leaks page.

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                      How to help your client reduce their telecommunications (mobile, landline and internet) costs

                       

                      To help customers know their rights the Australian Communications Consumer Action Network (ACCAN) has produced a Your rights as a phone and internet consumer guide.

                      There are a number of things your clients can do depending on what kind of plan they are on (long or short term, pre or post pay). If they are about to choose a new phone or internet package (be it pre or post pay) it is important that they ask the right questions. You may want to show them ACCAN’s Questions to ask before signing a phone contract article or download and provide them with the tip sheet. In addition they might be able to use ACCAN’s Mobile and broadband everyday money saving tips.

                      For customers already on a mobile contract or using a landline in shared housing it is good to know they can arrange to be alerted by their phone provider when they reach a pre-set spend level. Alternatively if they are living in shared housing they can arrange for sub-accounts (call out by using a pin code), which means they can split the phone more easily when the bill arrives. There a number of other strategies which your clients may want to consider, for more strategies and ideas visit Australian Communications and Media Authority’s Telecomms service options if you’re experiencing financial hardship fact sheet.
                      ACCAN provides many more information articles and tip sheets on topics that might be of use to your clients Received an unexpectedly high bill?, How to avoid smartphone bill shock and My home broadband is slow or unreliable, to name a few. To view the full range of their tip sheets visit their tip sheet page.

                      ACCAN also provides information and advice on overseas calling cards. In addition they also state which calling cards have the best and worst terms and conditions. Visit the How to choose a [international] pre-paid calling card website for more details and factsheets in various languages.

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                        Energy Safety  


                        Faulty or unsafe wiring - general (we recommend that you also review Energy Safety WA website for the latest information)


                        If your client believes that the house or unit they bought has faulty wiring at the point of sale then they should seek advice from Energy Safety WA by calling (08) 9422 5200.

                        If they are renting then they should ask their landlord or real estate agent about repairing the wiring. As long as the damage was not caused by ‘wilful and neglectful’ actions of the tenant (e.g. by putting a nail in the fuse box when a fuse has blown) the responsibility for repairing the faulty wiring rests with the landlord. Therefore the tenant should speak to their landlord or real estate agent. If no action is taken by the landlord or real estate they should contact Energy Safety WA by calling (08) 9422 5200.

                        If the faulty wiring is due to wilful and neglectful’ action by the tenant, then the tenant will be responsible for the costs of repairing the damage. If they are unsure if their action is wilful and neglectful, or they want to know what action they could/should take then they may want to contact their local Community Legal Centre for advice (and assistance if a dispute arises). They can use this directory to find their nearest Community Legal Centre. Alternatively they can contact Energy Safety WA by calling (08) 9422 5200 or the Department of Commerce (Consumer Protection division) by calling 1300 30 40 54 (National Relay Service: 13 36 77 for the hearing impaired) for general advice.

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                          Faulty or unsafe wiring - Unenclosed joints in insulated cables

                          (Information is sourced Energy Safety WA, Safety Information website, for the latest information we advise that you visit their website)


                          During the 1970s and early 80s, joints in electrical cables in ceiling spaces of dwellings and buildings were often only wrapped in insulating tape. The insulating tape dries out over time and may fall away, presenting an electric shock risk to persons who enter the ceiling space. Where a premise is found to contain unenclosed joints, the electrical contractor / electrician is to inform the owner/occupier of the situation and advise that remedial work is to be carried out. At that time, the electrical contractor / electrician will issue an advisory letter (provided by Energy Safety WA) to the owner/occupier, to inform the owner/occupier of the situation and associated hazards.

                          If the occupier is not the owner of the premise,[i.e. renting] the occupier is expected to hand the leaflet to the owner.

                          The electrical contractor will notify the network operator of the situation.

                          The onus is on the owner of the dwelling/building to have the remedial work carried out, using a licensed electrical contractor.

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                            No (or only one) RCD fitted


                            Residual Current Devices (RCDs) have been mandatory in all rental properties since August 2011 (at least a minimum of 2 required). If your client is renting and their house or unit does not have at least two RCDs fitted then your client should ask the landlord or real estate agent to have RCDs installed. If this does not resolve the situation then they should speak to Energy Safety WA by calling (08) 9422 5200.  Failure to install at least 2 RCDs risks exposing the landlord to penalties of up to $15,000 for individuals and $100,000 for a body corporates.

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                              How to tell if an RCD is fitted


                              An RCD looks like a circuit breaker but also has a test button.  The photograph below shows difference between a circuit breaker compared with an RCD (note the round test button). Combined RCD/circuit breakers are available also (see Energy Safety WA Types of RCDs webpage).  The combined devices also have a test button. There is a good chance that if it is in the fuse box and has a test button then it is a RCD or combined RCD/circuit breaker. For more information on RCD’s you or your client can visit the Energy Safety WA RCDs FAQ’s website. In addition you can also provide your client with this Energy Safety WA RCD factsheet (however it doesn’t explain how to identify a RCD).     

                              RCD vs Circuit Breaker
                               

                              Photo showing the difference between RCD and Circuit Breaker, notice that the circuit breaker does not have a test button, while the RCD has a small round test button (Photo sourced from Energy Safety WA).

                               

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                                No Smoke alarm


                                Smoke alarms have been mandatory in all rental properties since October 2011. If your client’s house or unit doesn’t have a smoke alarm they should contact the landlord or real estate agent. If that does not resolve the situation, they should speak to their Local Government (Council or Shire), who can inspect the property, issue a rectification notice, infringement notice or prosecute (the landlord) for any breaches with a fine up to $5 000. If your client has any other questions on Smoke Alarms you (or they) can download and provide them with FESA’s Smoke Alarms FAQs or visit FESA Smoke Alarm webpage. Remember, only working smoke alarms save lives, so remind them to change the batteries at least once a year.  
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                                  Other resources and campaigns


                                  Helpful Resources and Websites for consumer advocates

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                                  Telephone services - All Australians, regardless of location, are entitled to a working landline, plus other telephone obligations


                                  Everyone in Australia is entitled to a working landline service, regardless of their location. Telstra has an obligation to provide landline services because it has an agreement with the Federal Government called the Universal Service Obligation (USO). Compensation is available to customers for certain obligation breaches. Download this ACMA factsheet for more information. If your client believes that their phone provider has breached one of these obligations they should contact The Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman office either online or by phoning 1800 630 614.    

                                   

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                                    Stop door to door sales targeting your clients; join the ‘Do not knock’ campaign


                                    To help your clients avoid the pitfalls of door to door sales we are encouraging your organisation to join the ‘Do Not Knock’ campaign and help distribute these stickers. Stopping sales people from visiting your clients will ensure that they don’t encounter high pressure sales tactics from salespeople, which otherwise might see them enter into contracts which they may later regret.

                                    The campaign does not require your organisation to do anything except make the stickers available to your clients. There are 3 versions of the stickers, including one designed specifically for Indigenous communities, one by the ACCC and another by the Consumer Action Law Centre.  

                                    Do Not Knock_Unsolicited door to door selling is not welcome here 

                                     Do Not Knock_Sales People please note unsolicited door knocking here is unlawfulDo Not Knock sales people please note if you knock on my door you're breaking the law

                                     

                                    For more information please visit:

                                    How to order stickers

                                    • ACCC stickers can be ordered by visiting this page (Max 100 at a time)
                                    • Indigenous style stickers can be obtained by contacting Prue Woods at Financial Counsellors Australia 
                                    • Consumer Action Law Centre stickers can be ordered here (please note that they are a community based organisation with limiting funding so please consider this before ordering from them)

                                    You can also download the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s (ACCC) Door to Door Sales Factsheet which can teach your clients about their rights when a door to door salesperson knocks.
                                        
                                    WACOSS has a limited number of the indigenous style and ACCC stickers which can be collected from our West Leederville office. Please note: to reduce postage costs we ask that if possible you come and collect the stickers from us. Please call first to ensure that we have stickers in stock.

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                                      Stop telemarketers targeting your clients; add them to the ‘Do Not Call’ Register


                                      The Do Not Call Register will greatly reduce the amount of unwanted telemarketing calls and marketing faxes your clients receive. Telemarketers and fax marketers are required by law to stop contacting the phone number once it is on the register. For more information about the register visit the register’s FAQ webpage or click here to register your client’s phone numbers (with their consent of course), or go to this page to download their factsheets (available in other languages). 

                                       

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                                        Consumer protections under Australian Consumer Law – information on returning items without warranties and misleading consumers  


                                        What to know when considering getting an extended warranty (the below is taken from Consumer guarantees: A guide for businesses and legal practitioners)

                                         

                                        Some suppliers or manufacturers offer extended warranties to lengthen the coverage of their basic manufacturer’s warranty. Usually, consumers are offered the chance to buy an extended warranty after, or at the time, they buy the goods. Some suppliers or manufacturers also tell the consumer an extended warranty provides extra protection, which the consumer would not have unless they buy it. This is not necessarily true. The consumer guarantees provide rights that exist despite anything the supplier or manufacturer may say or do. Extended warranties are optional.

                                         

                                        Suppliers and manufacturers must not:
                                        • pressure consumers to buy an extended warranty
                                        • tell a consumer that they must pay for an extended warranty when such a warranty provides rights that are equivalent to a consumer’s rights under a consumer guarantee.
                                        When selling extended warranties, suppliers and manufacturers should explain to the consumer what an extended warranty would provide, over and above the consumer’s rights under the consumer guarantees.

                                        For example:

                                        A consumer buys a plasma television for $6000. It stops working two years later. The supplier tells the consumer they have no rights to repairs or another remedy as the television was only under the manufacturer’s warranty for 12 months. The supplier says the consumer should have bought an extended warranty, which would have given five years’ cover. A reasonable consumer would expect more than two years’ use from a $6000 television. Under the consumer guarantees, the consumer therefore has a statutory right to a remedy on the basis that the television is not of acceptable quality. The supplier must provide a remedy free of charge.

                                         

                                        This may also amount to misleading a consumer about their rights.

                                        What are false or misleading representations? (taken from Avoiding unfair business practices: A guide for businesses and legal practitioners)

                                         

                                        It is unlawful for a business to make false or misleading representations about goods or services when supplying, offering to supply, or promoting those goods or services. For instance, a business must not make false or misleading representations about:

                                        • the standard, quality, value or grade of goods or services
                                        • the composition, style, model or previous history or use of goods
                                        • whether the goods are new
                                        • a particular person agreeing to acquire goods or services
                                        • testimonials by any person relating to goods or services
                                        • the sponsorship, approval, performance characteristics, accessories, benefits and uses of goods or services
                                        • the price of goods or services
                                        • the availability of repair facilities or spare parts
                                        • the place of origin of a product (for example, where it was made or assembled)
                                        • a buyer’s need for the goods or services
                                        • any guarantee, warranty or condition on the goods or services
                                        • the requirement to pay for any guarantee, warranty or condition on the goods or services.
                                        Courts have found false and misleading representations in these cases:
                                        • a manufacturer sold socks, which were not pure cotton, labelled as ‘pure cotton’. Legal reference: TPC v Pacific Dunlop Limited (1994) ATPR 41-307
                                        • a retailer placed a label on garments showing a sale price and a higher, crossed-out price. However, the garments had never sold for the higher price. Legal reference: TPC v Cue Design Pty Ltd (1996) A Crim R 500; ATPR 41-475
                                        • a business made a series of untrue representations about the therapeutic benefits of negative ion mats it sold. Legal reference: ACCC v Giraffe World Australia Pty Ltd (1999) 95 FCR 302; 166 ALR 74
                                        • a motor repairer told a customer more repair work was needed on their car than was necessary. Legal reference: Dawson v Motor Tyre Service Pty Ltd (1981) ATPR 40-223
                                        Whether a representation is considered false or misleading will depend on the circumstances of each case. A representation that misleads one group of consumers may not necessarily mislead another group.

                                        There are a number of other provisions to the Australian Consumer Law. If your client believes that they have been misled or a business has broken the Australian Consumer Law they should contact either the ACCC online or by calling 1300 302 502, or the WA Department of Commerce online or by calling 1300 30 40 54 for advice. In addition these government bodies are able to prosecute businesses that commit an offence under Australian Consumer Law. Brochures and other publications on Australian Consumer Law can be downloaded from the Australian Consumer Law resources webpage.   
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                                          Resources for CALD communities


                                          All government services can be contacted via the Translating and Interpreting Service by calling 13 14 50. In addition many organisations already provide resources in other languages. Here are some webpages with brochures available in different languages.  

                                           

                                           

                                          Water Corporation

                                          The Energy Ombudsman of WA

                                          The Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman

                                          Living greener (Energy efficiency tips)

                                          Ausgrid (Energy efficiency in your language page)

                                          ACMA – Do Not Call Register

                                           

                                          ACCC

                                           

                                          ACCAN provides information and advice on overseas calling cards. In addition they also state which calling cards have the best and worst terms and conditions. Visit the How to choose a [international] pre-paid calling card website for more details and factsheets in various languages.

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                                            Contact Us

                                             

                                            WACOSS


                                            If you could not find what you were looking for or have a question about consumer protection for electricity, water and gas residential customers or if a link is no longer working or is outdated please click here to email Brent Savage, Coordinator Essential Services or phone (08) 9420 7222.

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